Charles Green Shaw

American, 1892-1974
SOLD
Cosmic Flight, 1958
**ADDITIONAL PAINTINGS BY THE ARTIST CURRENTLY IN INVENTORY. PLEASE CONTACT GALLERY FOR DETAILS.**

Born in New York City, Charles Shaw became a significant figure in the history of American abstract art. His work was noted for its clarity of form and architectural construction. In the later part of his life, he turned to Abstract Expressionism.

Shaw was described as a "wealthy man-about-town, poet and minor novelist" before he began to paint seriously when he was in his 30s. His parents died when he was young, and he was raised by an uncle.

He took a circuitous journey to life as an artist. From a wealthy New York family, he graduated from Yale in 1914 and completed a year of architectural studies at Columbia. In the 1920s he pursued journalism, writing articles on the city nightlife for The New Yorker, Vanity Fair and The Smart Set. Then in 1927, he began drawing, taking class at the Art Students League with Thomas Hart Benton and Georges Luks of the Ash Can School, delving into the tradition of portraiture, still life and landscapes.

Shaw served in World War I, and in the late 1920s and early 1930s, he took a long trip to Europe, living in Paris and London, traveling to Berlin, Vienna, Budapest, Florence, Rome, visiting museums, spending time with artists, reading about various genres of art, taking drawing classes, all while staying abreast of American trends. He met with fellow abstractionists Jean Hélion, Joan Miró and Le Corbusier in Paris, and with the artists Georges Braque, Constantin Brancusi, Wolfgang Paalen, Man Ray, Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth and John Ferren. This continuous and diverse exposure enriched Shaw's development as an artist and allowed him to become a special and original combination of American and European aesthetics.

Upon his return to the U.S. in 1933, Shaw began to depict abstracted versions of cityscapes, with the distinctly American imagery of the Manhattan skyscrapers appearing in his compositions in various degrees of abstraction. His immersion into the city and its resulting influence on his art was likely furthered as he undertook photography of New York and Brooklyn, used alongside his 1936 article on historical sites and becoming the book New York-Oddly Enough in 1938. Sharing similar artistic pursuits and ideals in American abstraction as well as friendship, Shaw, along with the artists George L. K. Morris, Suzy Frelinghuysen, and Albert Eugene Gallatin, became known as the "Park Avenue Cubists," a sophisticated group who pursued their own art and promoted the art of others.

As a key figure in early American abstraction, Charles Green Shaw was a unique amalgamation of a multifaceted life, education and career that resulted in a significant and beautiful body of art. Shaw holds the special recognition of being the only American born artist to be awarded two solo exhibitions during his lifetime at Solomon Guggenheim's Museum of Non-Objective Painting. He also was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group, established in 1936 in New York City to champion the understanding of abstract art. Shaw's works can be found in many public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian.

Julien Levy Gallery, New York, 1934

Solo, Valentine Gallery, New York, 1934

Gallery of Living Art, New York, 1935

Society of Independent Artists, 1935

"American Concretionists", Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, 1936

American Abstract Artists, 1937-1946

Jacques Seligmann & Co. Inc., New York, 1939

Art Institute of Chicago, 1943

Georgette Passedoit Gallery, 1941-1958

Carnegie Institute, 1945

Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945

Institute for Modern Art, Massachusetts, 1945

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1945-1963

Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, 1945

Salon des Realites, Paris, 1949-1950

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1952

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1954

Corcoran Gallery Biennial, Washington, DC, 1961

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1966

The Century Club, New York, 1967

Washburn Gallery, New York, 1975, 1979, 1982-1984, 1986

Richard York Gallery, New York, 1987

Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., New York, 1988

Washburn Gallery, New York, 1988-1992, 1997

Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts

Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Akron Museum of Art, Ohio

Alan R. Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky

Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois

Atlanta University, Georgia

Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland

Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia

Cantor Art Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California

Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio

The Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California

The Dayton Art Institute, Ohio

Denver Art Museum, Colorado

Fort Worth Community Arts Center, Texas

Georgia Museum of Art, Athens

Grey Art Gallery, New York University

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York

High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia

McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas

Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, New York

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Le Musée de l’Art Moderne, Paris, France

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts

Museum of Modern Art, New York

Newark Museum, New Jersey

National Gallery of the Arts, Washington, D.C.

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania

The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona

Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence

Rockefeller University, New York

St. Louis Art Museum, Missouri

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California

Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska

Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut

Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Wichita Art Museum, Kansas

Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut

Born in New York City, Charles Shaw became a significant figure in the history of American abstract art. His work was noted for its clarity of form and architectural construction. In the later part of his life, he turned to Abstract Expressionism.

Shaw was described as a "wealthy man-about-town, poet and minor novelist" before he began to paint seriously when he was in his 30s. His parents died when he was young, and he was raised by an uncle.

He took a circuitous journey to life as an artist. From a wealthy New York family, he graduated from Yale in 1914 and completed a year of architectural studies at Columbia. In the 1920s he pursued journalism, writing articles on the city nightlife for The New Yorker, Vanity Fair and The Smart Set. Then in 1927, he began drawing, taking class at the Art Students League with Thomas Hart Benton and Georges Luks of the Ash Can School, delving into the tradition of portraiture, still life and landscapes.

Shaw served in World War I, and in the late 1920s and early 1930s, he took a long trip to Europe, living in Paris and London, traveling to Berlin, Vienna, Budapest, Florence, Rome, visiting museums, spending time with artists, reading about various genres of art, taking drawing classes, all while staying abreast of American trends. He met with fellow abstractionists Jean Hélion, Joan Miró and Le Corbusier in Paris, and with the artists Georges Braque, Constantin Brancusi, Wolfgang Paalen, Man Ray, Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth and John Ferren. This continuous and diverse exposure enriched Shaw's development as an artist and allowed him to become a special and original combination of American and European aesthetics.

Upon his return to the U.S. in 1933, Shaw began to depict abstracted versions of cityscapes, with the distinctly American imagery of the Manhattan skyscrapers appearing in his compositions in various degrees of abstraction. His immersion into the city and its resulting influence on his art was likely furthered as he undertook photography of New York and Brooklyn, used alongside his 1936 article on historical sites and becoming the book New York-Oddly Enough in 1938. Sharing similar artistic pursuits and ideals in American abstraction as well as friendship, Shaw, along with the artists George L. K. Morris, Suzy Frelinghuysen, and Albert Eugene Gallatin, became known as the "Park Avenue Cubists," a sophisticated group who pursued their own art and promoted the art of others.

As a key figure in early American abstraction, Charles Green Shaw was a unique amalgamation of a multifaceted life, education and career that resulted in a significant and beautiful body of art. Shaw holds the special recognition of being the only American born artist to be awarded two solo exhibitions during his lifetime at Solomon Guggenheim's Museum of Non-Objective Painting. He also was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group, established in 1936 in New York City to champion the understanding of abstract art. Shaw's works can be found in many public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian.

Awards & Memberships

Selected Exhibitions

Julien Levy Gallery, New York, 1934

Solo, Valentine Gallery, New York, 1934

Gallery of Living Art, New York, 1935

Society of Independent Artists, 1935

"American Concretionists", Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, 1936

American Abstract Artists, 1937-1946

Jacques Seligmann & Co. Inc., New York, 1939

Art Institute of Chicago, 1943

Georgette Passedoit Gallery, 1941-1958

Carnegie Institute, 1945

Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945

Institute for Modern Art, Massachusetts, 1945

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1945-1963

Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, 1945

Salon des Realites, Paris, 1949-1950

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1952

Passedoit Gallery, New York, 1954

Corcoran Gallery Biennial, Washington, DC, 1961

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1966

The Century Club, New York, 1967

Washburn Gallery, New York, 1975, 1979, 1982-1984, 1986

Richard York Gallery, New York, 1987

Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., New York, 1988

Washburn Gallery, New York, 1988-1992, 1997

Museums & Collections

Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts

Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Akron Museum of Art, Ohio

Alan R. Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky

Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois

Atlanta University, Georgia

Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland

Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York

Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia

Cantor Art Center, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California

Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio

The Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, California

The Dayton Art Institute, Ohio

Denver Art Museum, Colorado

Fort Worth Community Arts Center, Texas

Georgia Museum of Art, Athens

Grey Art Gallery, New York University

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York

High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia

McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas

Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, New York

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Le Musée de l’Art Moderne, Paris, France

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts

Museum of Modern Art, New York

Newark Museum, New Jersey

National Gallery of the Arts, Washington, D.C.

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania

The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona

Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence

Rockefeller University, New York

St. Louis Art Museum, Missouri

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California

Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska

Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut

Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Wichita Art Museum, Kansas

Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut

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