Charlotte Park

American, 1918-2010
SOLD
Hickory, 1972
SOLD
Scree, 1976
**ADDITIONAL PAINTINGS BY THE ARTIST CURRENTLY IN INVENTORY. PLEASE CONTACT GALLERY FOR DETAILS.**

Charlotte Park was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1918. From 1935 to 1939, she studied at the Yale School of Fine Arts in New Haven, Connecticut. She moved to New York City in 1945 and studied privately with Australian artist Wallace Harrison, who also instructed noted abstract artist Helen Frankenthaler.

It was in New York that Park met fellow artist James Brooks, and they married two years later. Park and Brooks began visiting the Springs in East Hampton in 1949, and bought property there in 1957. Both Park and Brooks were important members of the growing artistic community on Long Island.

Park was included in the Whitney Museum of American Art Annual Exhibition of 1935, and exhibited regularly at the prominent Stable Gallery in New York throughout the 1950s. Park also taught at the Dalton School in New York in 1951, as well as at the Museum of Modern Art, New York from 1955 to 1957.

In 1979, Guild Hall in East Hampton held an exhibition of her works from the 1970s. The Parrish Art Museum in Southampton hosted Three East End Artists in 2003, featuring Park alongside Dan Christensen and Allan Wexler as three influential artists who have lived and worked on Long Island.

Examples of her work can be found at The Parrish Museum of Art in Southampton, New York, Guild Hall in East Hampton, New York, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Whitney Museum of American Art Annual Exhibition, 1935

Stable Gallery, New York, 1950s

Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York, 1979

"Three East End Artists", The Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York, 2003

The Parrish Museum of Art, Southampton, New York

Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Charlotte Park was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1918. From 1935 to 1939, she studied at the Yale School of Fine Arts in New Haven, Connecticut. She moved to New York City in 1945 and studied privately with Australian artist Wallace Harrison, who also instructed noted abstract artist Helen Frankenthaler.

It was in New York that Park met fellow artist James Brooks, and they married two years later. Park and Brooks began visiting the Springs in East Hampton in 1949, and bought property there in 1957. Both Park and Brooks were important members of the growing artistic community on Long Island.

Park was included in the Whitney Museum of American Art Annual Exhibition of 1935, and exhibited regularly at the prominent Stable Gallery in New York throughout the 1950s. Park also taught at the Dalton School in New York in 1951, as well as at the Museum of Modern Art, New York from 1955 to 1957.

In 1979, Guild Hall in East Hampton held an exhibition of her works from the 1970s. The Parrish Art Museum in Southampton hosted Three East End Artists in 2003, featuring Park alongside Dan Christensen and Allan Wexler as three influential artists who have lived and worked on Long Island.

Examples of her work can be found at The Parrish Museum of Art in Southampton, New York, Guild Hall in East Hampton, New York, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Awards & Memberships

Selected Exhibitions

Whitney Museum of American Art Annual Exhibition, 1935

Stable Gallery, New York, 1950s

Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York, 1979

"Three East End Artists", The Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York, 2003

Museums & Collections

The Parrish Museum of Art, Southampton, New York

Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

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